Three Sisters Stuff

I have to say – I’m really pleased with the Three Sisters method of companion planting. I did three different patches, and two of the three are doing so well. The third one is up in the “raised bed of death” and while it’s growing, it’s extremely stunted. I may just count that one as a loss and use the short corn stalks for decoration this fall…we’ll see.

However, the other two, located in my 5×5 Challenge garden, are flourishing:

This is Three Sisters #2 and it contains strawberry popcorn, Rattlesnake pole beans, African Bottle gourds, and Cinderalla pumpkins. Some of the corn sustained significant aphid damage early in the year, but it now seems to be doing great, albeit a little behind. It’s exciting to think that I may actually get popcorn out of this bed. The beans are doing well, as are both the vines…especially the pumpkins.

They’re creeping their way into the tomato patch, which I don’t particularly mind. There’s space for them, and it helps shade the soil around the base of the tomatoes.

This is Three Sisters #1 – Dent Corn, Cherokee Trail of Tears pole beans, and Minnesota Midget melons. The corn in this bed is really taking off and starting to form tassels. The beans were my first venture into seed saving – I saved some pods from a friend’s garden last fall and they’re doing well.

The melon vines are in full bloom, and I’ve been finding a few of these little fuzzballs on them:

I will certainly be using this method of growing in the future. It’s a great way to utilize space and grow some healthy plants.

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2 Comments to “Three Sisters Stuff”

  1. Really great to see the 5×5 in action…I didn’t know how possible it was to fit so many crops in so it’s nice to follow your photo’s.

    • I know what you mean. I’ve been surprised myself at how much I can fit in one area. Even though this garden is technically more like a “5×15” challenge, I’m still able to fit in six different types of plants and 13 varieties total. It makes me happy to know that last year this garden was just lawn – now it’s a food source!

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